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La Chatelaine Jewelry

  • Rotterdam Art Fair

    Meet me at Rotterdam Art Fair

    30th of March - 2nd of April

    Stand 29

    www.rdamartfair.nl

  • John Rubel ballerina

    John Rubel ballerina brooch and pair of earrings, 1940s John Rubel ballerina demi-parure from the 1940s

    “John Rubel’s jewels have always danced. My wish today is that they resume their ballet of shapes and colors“, says Sophie Mizrahi-Rubel, granddaughter and president of John Rubel Paris.

    The Franco-American company which was founded by the two Hungarian Rubel brothers had from 1943 to 1947 a New York branch. It was in a famous nightclub that John Rubel scribbled the design for the ballerina brooch on a napkin. He gave the serviette to Maurice Duvallet to work out the design. Duvallet worked also for Van Cleef & Arpels and VCA took one of the ballerina’s in production. It was Van Cleef & Arpels who made the ballerina brooches famous, but the father of the ballerina was unmistakably John Rubel. The brooch is part of a demi-parure with a pair of earrings set in 18K gold and sapphires.

  • Toi & Moi ring

    Toi & Moi or You & Me ring

    Who can say my wife (girlfriend) or my husband (boyfriend) is my best friend is very rich and blessed in life. A French Toi & Moi ring represents this idea: 2 stones or 2 pearls representing 2 souls intertwined until death do us part. Although these types of rings were already made in the beginning of the 18th century (see also Le bijou de sentiment, an exhibition organised by Chaumet in 2008), I believe it was Napoleon who made this type of ring popular. The to be French emperor offered his future empress Josephine a toi et moi engagement ring in 1795. The ring was made of a diamond and sapphire pear and was sold in 2013 at auction for a million euros. Although not worn by an empress I  offer a beautiful and moderate priced toi & moi ring from the 1950s. The 2 diamonds are set in a platinum eternity sign. This ring might just be the perfect gift for your Valentine.

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  • How to wear vintage jewelry: brooches, pins and clips (part V)

    Nicole Kidman wearing a vintage brooch on the sleeve of her dress Nicole Kidman at the Critic's Choice Awards in Santa Monica december 2016, wearing a vintage brooch on the sleeve of her dress

    I found a photo of Nicole Kidman attending the Critic's Choice Awards in Santa Monica last year. Do you see where she is wearing her vintage brooch? Pretty fancy place! The geometric pattern of the brooch compliments the triangle forms of her dress. I have in my shop a Mauboussin diamond spray clip from the 1950s. I'm looking for the dress that goes well with this form. Maybe an asymmetric dress from the retro period. Anyone?

  • Zip necklace by VCA

    vca_zipper_60000“Sous le marteau” came one of Van Cleef & Arpels most iconic necklace. The Zip necklace. It saw the light in 1951 after many years of innovation. It was the Duchess of  Windsor who came with the idea to design a piece of zipper jewelry. The Zip necklace has a small device that is used to zip and unzip the necklace. Open it was worn as a necklace and closed as a bracelet. According to the auction house Leclere a few rubies were replaced by diamonds and the necklace needs to be revised. Although when I asked about it, the expert could still unzip the necklace. A truly beautiful piece of jewelry. VCA made several models in diamonds and in colored stones. Only a few came to auction in the last 60 years. Oh and the hammer price? 66.000,- euros.

  • How to wear vintage jewelry: brooches, pins and clips (part IV)

    Here is a selection of some alternative ways to wear a brooch on cocktail dresses and frog gowns. You can accentuate your body parts, you can hide a zipper or tighten a dress or just stand out from the crowd.

  • Set of 1940s snowflake brooches

    VAC advertentie voor snowflake clips 1946 Van Cleef & Arpels advertisement for snowflake brooches (1946)

    Trifari in Vogue 1950 Nice example of how to wear a set of vintage brooches, one little bigger than the other, like the snowflakes

    set of 18K gold and diamond snowflake brooches set of 18K gold and diamond snowflake brooches

    How to wear vintage jewelry like these snowflake brooches? In the 1940s brooches were worn together as a set. In a Paris auction, I bought this lovely set of 2 small snowflake brooches. One is a little bigger than the other. Snowflakes were extremely popular after the war. Van Cleef & Arpels introduced them in 1946. Here you can see 2 advertisements of how to wear them: The lady with the snowflake brooches on her hat is from VCA and the other lady with a set of diamond clovers are from the House of Trifari.

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  • Showers of Sapphire

    showers of sapphire in a 18K gold brooch showers of sapphires in 18K gold retro brooch

    I found these wonderful showers of sapphires in a Paris auction. It’s a beautiful French 18K gold retro brooch and a good example of 1940s escapism.

    Escapism of the 1940s was an important motif in pre- and mid-war jewelry. Eye-catching jewelry was used to forget the doom and gloom of the war. Jewels were extravagant and extrovert, bold and bossy with voluptuous curves and plumed up into massive 3-dimensial designs. Jewelry was bursting with ribbons of yellow gold and showers of sapphires*. Indulge yourself with a beautiful pin and lift WWII  escapism to modern hedonism. It is more contemporain than ever.

    * quotes from “Antique and Twentieth century jewellery” by Vivienne Becker (chapter 22).

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  • Taboo on synthetic rubies?

    1940 TANK ring with diamonds and synthetic rubies 1940 TANK ring with diamonds and synthetic rubies. Sometimes my eye is caught by a very strong design, that is so appealing that I can’t go by it without touching it, louping it, putting it on and in the end buying it. And sometimes I ignore the fact that the design is set with synthetic stones. In this case this very 1940s TANK*ring. The ring is set with 3 brilliant cut diamonds that are accentuated by a row of synthetic rubies.

    I think there is still a taboo on synthetic rubies and sapphires. Why is that? Costume jewelry is widely accepted and in most cases not cheap at all (think Chanel in the 1920s). Another example are glass and pastes look-a likes, they were popular for centuries. But when it comes to high end jewelry were natural stones are combined with synthetics it raises some eyebrows. Synthetics came in use after the war, although the French chemist Auguste Verneuil already invented the stones or better to say the process of flame fusion, in the 1890s. After the war natural stones were rare and synthetics were cheap and available.

    Rubies were the most popular gemstones of the 1940s period.  Partly because they went well with pink gold and partly because of their warm feminine colour. Smaller stones could be used to great effects. At this time synthetic stones were widely used and mixed with precious gems to create great colour effects or to accentuate, like in edges, ridges and on the side. So when you come across a piece of period jewelry with synthetic rubies or synthetic sapphires it is not to con you, but this was a logic and deliberate choice of the goldsmith or designer of that time.

    18K gold and diamond TANK ring with synthetic rubies Taboo on synthetic rubies: 18K gold and diamond TANK ring with synthetic rubies

    *The description TANK in capitals is a referral to Machine Age Jewelry, a whole different chapter. More on TANK jewelry coming soon.

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